Starting and Stopping s-Server Manually

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Starting and Stopping s-Server Manually

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By default, SQLstream s-Server runs as a service. This service will automatically start when you log into your Linux environment.

To start your SQLstream s-Server manually, you need to be logged in as the sqlstream default user. This is the user that you indicated (or created) during the installation process. You can then run the script named "s-Server", located in the bin directory:

$SQLSTREAM_HOME/bin/s-Server

 

You can also run the server without logging in as the s-Server default user by using this syntax from the $SQLSTREAM_HOME/bin/ directory.

sudo -u <default user> ./s-Server

 

Note: The first time you run the server, it creates a checkpoint. Before you run the server for the first time, you cannot restore the catalog because no checkpoint exists.

Stopping the SQLstream s-Server

To stop the SQLstream s-Server, type:

!quit

 

into the SQLstream s-Server terminal window. This will stop the server, create a checkpoint backup of the repository, and close the window.

If there are open client connections to the server (for example, if the user interface is running), the server will alert you and continue running.

If you need to stop the server in spite of open client connections, type:

!kill

 

into the SQLstream s-Server terminal window. This will force closure of the connections, then stop the server and create a checkpoint backup of the repository.

In the event that neither !quit nor !kill is able to stop the server, you can type Ctrl+C into the SQLstream s-Server terminal window. This will abort the server and shut down the repository, but will not create the checkpoint backup of the repository. When you next restart the server, it will restore the previous checkpoint backup, so any changes made to repository objects since then will be lost. Obviously, this option should only be used in extreme circumstances.